A Better Place

On an early autumn day in Shiwa, you can see cosmos flowers growing in gardens and fields, wild in the forgotten lots of abandoned houses, and stubbornly in cracks in the sidewalk. They are almost everywhere, and they bloom in purple, pink, yellow, and orange.

A man from Shiwa bred an orange variety called “Sunset” and won the prestigious All American Selection award for his efforts in 1966. Now they grow in abundance, low like ground fog on which orange flowers float.

Other varieties can grow taller than people and would look like the worst kind of weeds with spidery leaves and reddish stalks but for their flowers. The flowers seem as thin and weak as paper, like they wouldn’t survive the wind of a typhoon or even the rain. Yet they grow in difficult places, in cracks, between rocks, and along chain link fences.

This is what I love about them. They don’t choose where they grow, but they survive, and in so doing they make it, no matter where it is, a better place.

より良い場所

初秋の紫波では、コスモスの花が庭や畑に、忘れられた廃屋の敷地内に野生化して、そして強情に歩道の割れ目にも見られる。コスモスはほぼ全域で見られ、紫やピンク、黄色、オレンジ色の花を咲かせる。

紫波出身の男性が「サンセット」と呼ばれるオレンジ色の新種を作り、1966年に名誉あるオールアメリカンセレクション賞を受賞した。今では、その品種はあちこちで見られる。その背は低く、地霧の上をオレンジ色の花が漂っているようだ。

その他の品種は人の背よりも高く伸び、蜘蛛のような葉と赤い茎を持つ、一番性質の悪い雑草のように見える。花が無ければ。花は紙のように薄くて弱く、台風の風や、ただの雨でさえも耐えられないように見える。それでいて、困難な場所、割れ目や石と石の間、金網のフェンスの傍に生える。

僕がコスモスを好きなのはこのためだ。コスモスは生える場所を選ばない。しかし、何とか生き延び、そうすることによって、どこに生えていても、そこをより良い所に見せるのだ。

 

Ducking into a Coat

Before moving to Shiwa, close spaces made me think of modernity and its population booms and industrialized cities. Now the shoulder to shoulder buildings in old areas make it easy for me to imagine that when villages developed along the Kitakami, people gathered around wells and stuck together for fear of being lost to the wild.

With kuras, garages, businesses, and even in some cases former houses next to new ones, the oldest families in town live in close conditions. Their homes are compounds.

In other cases families gave over plots of land for relatives to build houses, but the fields always had priority. Leaving them untouched meant sacrificing living space. Houses were built feet apart and became clusters.

Yet this kind of nearness is comforting. Surrounding oneself with family and basing a town on the premise of resource sharing and protection is to build a support system.

The old commercial district, Hizume Shotengai, is packed with long and narrow buildings. Some are new, and others old and abandoned.  Of all the places in Shiwa, it feels the most like New York City. Yet it’s cozy. Stepping out of a bar on an autumn night and into streets too narrow for cars can feel like ducking into a coat. It’s a feeling of  safety and warmth compared to the darkness that hovers over the mountains and rice fields.

コートにもぐり込む

紫波に越してくる前は、狭い空間を見ると、近代性や人口の急増、そして工業都市が頭に浮かんだ。今は、歴史ある地域で肩を寄せ合う家々を見ると、集落が北上川に沿って発展した際、人々は自然に飲み込まれることを恐れて井戸の周りに集まったのだと、容易に想像できる。

町で最も古くからいる人々は、蔵や車庫、店舗、場合によっては元住宅が、現在の住宅に密接した状況下に暮らしている。彼らの屋敷は複数の建物で構成されている。

親戚に宅地用として区画を譲った場合もあるが、それでも田畑が常に優先された。田畑に手をつけないということは、居住空間を犠牲にすることを意味する。そのため、家々は数メートル間隔で建てられ、住宅群となった。

けれども、こういった近接さは心が和む。家族に囲まれ、資源の共有や保護を前提として町を形成することで、結いの仕組みが生まれる。

歴史ある商業地区である日詰商店街には、細長い建物がぎっしり詰まっている。新しいものもあるが、古いもの、廃屋となったものもある。紫波のどこよりも、ここはニューヨークを思わせる。それでいて居心地が良い。秋の夜、バーから出て、車には狭すぎる路地へと足を踏み出すと、コートに潜り込んだようだ。それは安心感と温もりの感覚。山々や水田の上を彷徨う暗闇とは対照的に。