Slow Motion Change

Shiwa is in a state of change, but it’s a slow motion change. One that’s been going on for more than a generation. The agricultural sector is shrinking, and in the central part of town, the part sprawled along national highway Route 4, fields are being replaced with housing developments. Given the difficulty of freeing land resources and the established tradition of close quarter living, these new neighborhoods are as packed as the old business district.

The houses are nothing like the suburbs from my childhood in Colorado. They have just enough space between them for a car or two and no yards. Asphalt and gravel cover the ground from the street to the doors. The soil beneath is so fertile that despite these efforts weeds still push up in unlikely places.

This may be ideal for commuters who use Shiwa for a bedroom, but the newly confined space reduces the green and shrinks the sky.

スローモーションの変化

紫波は変化の過程にあるが、その変わり方は緩やかで、一世代以上続いている。農業分野は縮小しており、町の中央部である国道4号沿いに不規則に広がった地域では、田畑が宅地に取って代わられている。土地資源の解放が難しいことと、密接した住環境という深く根付いた伝統によって、新しく開発された住宅地も歴史ある商業地区同様に混み合っている。

ここの住宅は、僕が幼少期を過ごしたコロラドの郊外とは全く異なる。家と家の間には車1、2台分の空間しかなく、庭もない。前の通りから玄関に続く地面はアスファルトと砂利に覆われている。土壌がとても肥沃なため、このような対処をしても、雑草が思わぬ所から押し出てくる。

紫波を寝室と見なす通勤者にとっては理想的かもしれない。しかし、この新しく押し込められたような空間では、緑が減り空は狭くなる。

Ducking into a Coat

Before moving to Shiwa, close spaces made me think of modernity and its population booms and industrialized cities. Now the shoulder to shoulder buildings in old areas make it easy for me to imagine that when villages developed along the Kitakami, people gathered around wells and stuck together for fear of being lost to the wild.

With kuras, garages, businesses, and even in some cases former houses next to new ones, the oldest families in town live in close conditions. Their homes are compounds.

In other cases families gave over plots of land for relatives to build houses, but the fields always had priority. Leaving them untouched meant sacrificing living space. Houses were built feet apart and became clusters.

Yet this kind of nearness is comforting. Surrounding oneself with family and basing a town on the premise of resource sharing and protection is to build a support system.

The old commercial district, Hizume Shotengai, is packed with long and narrow buildings. Some are new, and others old and abandoned.  Of all the places in Shiwa, it feels the most like New York City. Yet it’s cozy. Stepping out of a bar on an autumn night and into streets too narrow for cars can feel like ducking into a coat. It’s a feeling of  safety and warmth compared to the darkness that hovers over the mountains and rice fields.

コートにもぐり込む

紫波に越してくる前は、狭い空間を見ると、近代性や人口の急増、そして工業都市が頭に浮かんだ。今は、歴史ある地域で肩を寄せ合う家々を見ると、集落が北上川に沿って発展した際、人々は自然に飲み込まれることを恐れて井戸の周りに集まったのだと、容易に想像できる。

町で最も古くからいる人々は、蔵や車庫、店舗、場合によっては元住宅が、現在の住宅に密接した状況下に暮らしている。彼らの屋敷は複数の建物で構成されている。

親戚に宅地用として区画を譲った場合もあるが、それでも田畑が常に優先された。田畑に手をつけないということは、居住空間を犠牲にすることを意味する。そのため、家々は数メートル間隔で建てられ、住宅群となった。

けれども、こういった近接さは心が和む。家族に囲まれ、資源の共有や保護を前提として町を形成することで、結いの仕組みが生まれる。

歴史ある商業地区である日詰商店街には、細長い建物がぎっしり詰まっている。新しいものもあるが、古いもの、廃屋となったものもある。紫波のどこよりも、ここはニューヨークを思わせる。それでいて居心地が良い。秋の夜、バーから出て、車には狭すぎる路地へと足を踏み出すと、コートに潜り込んだようだ。それは安心感と温もりの感覚。山々や水田の上を彷徨う暗闇とは対照的に。