Monstrous Caterpillars of White

I often tell people that Shiwa is a beautiful town despite itself. Cost and function are the primary concerns that go into the majority of building designs, a fact the architecture itself reflects. Metal fences painted green or white are the norm. The town is disheveled with power lines. Power poles are complex metal lean-tos marked with reflectors to guarantee they stand out. Metal stabbed into the earth is a common sight. Most of the beauty occurs naturally in the mountain and forests and streams that surround the town.

With this in mind, I was looking at the grape vines in the eastern part of Shiwa. I’ve always had the image of orchards and grape vines as beautiful places. I think of books by Peter Mayle or movies about France or California, stories or pictures that depict an effort to keep the landscape beautiful. But in Shiwa the vines are held and protected by metal poles. At times they’re covered with opaque plastic, and the terraced landscape in the mountains is covered with monstrous caterpillars of white. Like the town, they stand out dramatically from the landscape around them.

(Proviso: the new Ogal Plaza is going to be gorgeous.)

白い巨大ないも虫

僕はよく人に話す。紫波は、自らの意に反して、美しい、と。費用と機能は建築物のデザインにおける主要な関心事で、それは建築にも反映されている。緑や白に塗られた金属のフェンスは典型だ。町は電線でだらしなく見える。電柱は金属の複雑な支柱がついており、必ず目立つようにと反射物が付いている。地面に刺さった金属はよく見かけるものだ。町の美しさは自然に発生したもので、町を囲む山や森、小川によく見られる。

このことを念頭に、紫波の東部にあるぶどう畑を眺めていた。僕は常に、果樹園やぶどう畑は美しい所という印象を持っていた。ピーター・メイルの本や、フランスやカリフォルニアについての映画、美しい風景を維持しようとする努力を描いた物語や絵画に思いを馳せる。しかし紫波では、ぶどうの木は金属棒で保護されている。時には、透明のプラスチックで覆われ、白い巨大ないも虫が山の階段状になった地形に広がる。町と同様に、それらは周囲の風景から著しく突出する。

(但し、新しいオガールプラザは極めて美しいだろう。)

Desolation to Hope

The rice fields in winter are rolling mounds of snow, but if you look closer or when the level of snow drops, you can see the remnants of the rice plants. This straw sticking out would look a mess, like something used and discarded, but because they remain in straight rows, there is a pattern. In winter these patterns are all that indicate the snow covers farmland.

I thought this was depressing at first: the dry straw sticking out of the snow like carcasses revealed by a thaw. When I learned that the soil would be overturned and the straw returned to the soil, I found it oppressive. To spend a winter beneath the oppressive weight of too much snow only to be buried when it cleared seemed a sorry fate.

With more and more time, I’ve learned about the farms and the landscape of Shiwa, and my feelings have changed. I’ve seen the snows come and go and learned about the rhythm of the seasons. I’ve seen the harvests and the planting, and I’ve seen the lazy summertimes when the rice is so heavy it bows politely and then the hurried preparations before winter. It’s like watching people move things from one location to another and back again with the practice of generations.

I get the feeling that nothing disappears, but everything is transferred to another form and then returned. One step in the process only suggests the next. Now when I see the lines of straw I don’t think about the past, but the future. What was once desolation became hope.

荒廃から希望へ

冬の水田は波打つ雪の小山だが、よく見ると、あるいは雪の高さが下がると、稲の面影がうかがえる。突き出ている藁は、使い捨てられたもののように、乱雑に見えるが、真っ直ぐに並んだままであるため、文様になっている。冬においては、この文様のみが、農地は雪で覆われているということを物語る。

僕は最初、気が滅入ることだと思った。雪が融けることで、乾燥した藁が死骸のように雪から突き出る。土壌は掘り起こされ、藁は土に帰ると聞いた時、抑圧的だと思った。多すぎる雪の制圧的な重さの下で冬を過ごし、雪が無くなれば土に埋められるなんて、気の毒な運命だと。

時が経つにつれ、農地や紫波の風景についての理解が深まり、僕の思いは変わった。雪が降り、やがて融けてなくなるのを目撃し、季節のリズムが分かった。収穫、田植え、とても重くなった穂が礼儀正しくお辞儀する気だるい夏の日、そして慌しい冬を迎える準備を目にした。それは、人々が物を1つの場所から別の場所へ動かし、また元へ戻す。何世代も行ってきた慣わしのようなものだ。

何も消え去りはしないのだという感じはするが、何もかもが別の形態へと変わり、そしてまた戻る。その過程における1つのステップは、次を示唆するに過ぎない。今では、僕は藁の列を見ても、過去ではなく、未来について考える。かつての荒廃が希望になった。

Ink and Wash

The landscape in Shiwa in winter is, without exaggeration, bleak. Snow falls and stays. Driveways are trenches. Mountain floors become white and show through leafless trees like the scalps of balding men. Snow hangs on the branches of trees; they sag beneath the burden. Anything aspiring towards the heavens for relief is stopped by the gray ceiling of ever present clouds.

Shiwa is a different place. The vibrant life is buried beneath it—variety becomes sameness. I get lost on familiar roads. I forget the character of the plants that comprise my yard. Even light moves differently—filtered through dark clouds, the sky dulled while the ground glows with the reflections off the snow.

Yet there is beauty. Scenes covered in snowfall take on a sameness of color, like varying shades of the same black ink diluted with water. Shiwa in winter is an ink and wash painting.

水墨画

紫波の冬の景色は、誇張なしに、殺風景だ。雪が降り、そのまま残る。家への進入路は堀だ。山肌は白くなり、禿げかかった男の頭皮のように、葉の無い木から透けて見える。雪は木の枝にしがみ付く。枝はその重みにたわむ。救いを求めて天を目指すものは何でも、灰色の天井のような存在感のある雲によって遮られる。

紫波は異なった場所だ。活気ある生命はその下に埋もれ、多様性は単一と化す。僕は慣れた道でさえ迷う。家の庭を構成する植物の特徴を忘れてしまう。光すら異なって動く。空はどんよりとする一方、暗雲から漏れた光が雪に反射し、地上は柔らかく輝く。

それでも美しさはある。雪に覆われた景色は類似した色、水で薄めた墨色の様々な色合いを帯びる。冬の紫波は水墨画となる。

A Stack of Wood

A stack of wood is comforting. Solid yet soft, wood provides a comfortable stability and a feeling of closeness to nature. Stacked neatly, it presents the illusion of order. In the mess of a snowstorm, that order reduces the sense of chaos. The dangers of winter, the chaos, are survived through preparation and planning, and stacks of firewood are a manifestation of that.

At the same time, firewood makes me feel nostalgic. It reminds me of when I was young in Colorado and people used fireplaces all the time without fear of climate change. It reminds me of the smell of smoke on crisp winter air. I remember nights sitting with my legs stretched towards a fireplace watching orange flames dance while feeling the heat on my skin. I’m transported back to that time whenever I see a stack of wood standing in falling snow.

薪の山

積み上げられた薪の山に心が和む。頑丈であるが柔らかい、木は心地よい安定感と自然に近いという感覚をもたらす。整然と積まれた木を、秩序と錯覚する。吹雪がもたらす乱雑さの中においては、その秩序が混乱を和らげる。準備と計画をもって冬の脅威、混乱を乗り越える。薪の山はその顕現だ。

同時に、薪を見ると懐かしさを覚える。僕が小さい時にコロラドで、人々が気候変動を恐れることなく暖炉を使った、その頃を思い出す。すがすがしい冬の空気に漂う煙の匂い。暖炉に向けて足を伸ばし、オレンジ色の炎が舞うのを見ながら肌に熱を感じた夜。僕は雪が降る中に積み上げられた薪を見るたび、僕はたちまちその頃に思いを馳せる。

Golden Light on a Canvas of Snow

Many houses in Shiwa are withdrawn from the roads and require long driveways for access. In winter they can be difficult to keep clear of snow, and the farther you get from the center of town the less likely you are to expect guests. So it’s easy to understand how shoveling snow can fall down several notches on your list of priorities. You have less time to do it too since the sun begins its descent as early as four in the afternoon (there’s no daylight savings in Shiwa). However, all of these factors combine to form this scene, a moment in which the sun setting behind the mountain range spilled golden light on a pure canvas of snow and rendered the shadows blue. This town never ceases to provide such moments.

清らかな雪のキャンヴァスに黄金の光

紫波の家の多くは公道から引きこもっており、そこへ行くには長いドライブウェイが必要だ。冬には時として、雪を払うのが大変で、町の中心から離れるほど、訪問者のある確率は低くなる。だから、雪掻きの優先順位が下がってしまうのは容易に理解できる。雪掻きに割ける時間も少ない。なぜなら、4時ごろには日が暮れ始めるから。(紫波には夏時間がない。)しかし、これらすべての要因が重なり、この景色を創り出す。太陽が山々奥羽山脈の背後に沈む間、清らかな雪のキャンヴァスに黄金色の光がこぼれ、影を青く染める瞬間だ。この町は、このような瞬間の連続だ。

Strangely Comfortable

This is the road I named Sahinai River Road and then found out that the stream running along side it is called Nakasawa River. Stubborn till the end, I still call it Sahinai River Road.

We were sitting in the car on Sahinai River Road eating a variety of breads we bought from “Furusato Center,” Sahinai’s farmers’ market, for lunch when a miniature gust of wind gathered and blew through these icy trees. The snow was frozen into powder, and it caught in the wind and swirled into a cloud that blotted out this winter scene.

Sitting still, no other people or cars around, on a mountain road, in the burst of whiteout conditions, I felt strangely comfortable. When I realized it was strange, I wanted to take a picture, but by the time I was out of the car, the cloud of snow disappeared, and a blue sky appeared.

妙に心地よい

これは僕が「Sahinai River Road」と名付けた道だが、この脇を流れる小川は中沢川と呼ばれると後に判明した。最後まで頑固な僕は、それでも「Sahinai River Road」と呼んでいる。

Sahinai River Roadに車を停め、佐比内の産直である「ふるさとセンター」から買ってきた様々なパンを昼食として食べていた。その時、ちょっとした一陣の風が起きて凍った木々の間を吹き抜けた。雪が凍って粉状になり、風に捕らえられ渦を巻いてこの冬景色を覆い隠す雲となった。
人も車もないこの山道で、突如視界の利かなくなった状況の中、じっと座っていると、妙に心地よく感じた。それが妙だと気付いた時、写真を撮りたくなったが、僕が車から出る頃には、雪雲は去り、青空になっていた。

Keeping the Forest

Autumn has deepened, the insects have all but vanished, and the forest has divided into two camps. One is occupied by trees that invested heavily in leaves in the spring, soaked up the sun, and lived well in the good times. As soon as the weather turned, they dumped the leaves all over the forest floor, shedding everything they could to survive.

The other camp grew as much as was prudent in the spring. Slowly and steadily they added to themselves, but kept themselves strong. Now in autumn some parts may have browned, but they haven’t fallen. They’re still green.

While the first camp, the aspens, the maples, the zelkovas and all their friends, now look cold and bare, the second camp the pine trees, the cedars and the, uhm, other cedars (there are lots of cedars), look the same. Their basic green leaves become insulation for those weaker in the community. Without them, the naked wood, seemingly bereft of life, would be debris, not a forest.

秋が深まり、虫はほとんど姿を消し、森は2つの陣営に分かれる。1つ目は、春には葉に深く覆われ、陽の光を浴び、景気の良い時期を過ごした。気候が変わるとすぐに、林床一面に葉を捨て、生き残るために全てをそぎ落とす。

もう1つの陣営は、春に良識のある程度に生長した。ゆっくりかつ着実に枝葉を増やし、健全さを保った。秋である今、ある部分は茶色に変わったが、落葉してはいない。まだ緑のままだ。

第1陣営はアスペンや楓、檜とその仲間達で、今や剥き出しになり寒そうだ。第2陣営は松や杉、そして、えーっと、その他の杉(杉にも多くの種類がある)は以前と同じに見える。それら木々の葉はコミュニティの中の弱者にとっての断熱材となる。それ無しでは、一見命を奪われたような裸の木々は、森ではなく、残骸となってしまう。

Metal Titans

No matter where you are in Shiwa, it seems, you can find a signal for your cell phone. Gone are the days of spotty reception, dead zones, and good excuses to hang up on bothersome people.

“I’m sorry. I’m in Sahinai and you’re breaking up.” Click.

The reason: cellphone towers are everywhere. They join the massive high-power electrical transmission towers that climb the mountains in making it seem as though humanity’s answer to the designs of the forest is metal titans.

Given their surroundings, the towers seem otherworldly. Like me at a party, they do nothing to blend in. Like daggers stabbed in the earth, they’re anything but organic. Like jungle gyms for giants,  the electrical towers are so massive they can be seen from far away. Like strangely narrow satellite dishes, the cell phone towers point towards the sky.

No wait. Forget that last simile. I can’t pass a cell phone tower standing above a forest without picturing a watchtower from the rebel base on Yavin 4.

In any event, they’re everywhere, keeping every part of Shiwa connected. For better or worse.

 

 

金属の巨人

紫波のどこへいても、どうやら携帯電話の電波は届いているようだ。むらのある受信状態や全く届かないエリア、煩わしい人からの電話を切る言い訳の日々は過ぎ去った。

「ごめん、いま佐比内にいるんだ。よく聞こえないよ。」ガチャ。

理由:携帯電話の電波塔は至る所にある。それらの仲間は巨大な高電圧送電塔で、山へ登るその姿は、森のデザインに対する人類の答えは金属の巨人だと言わんばかりだ。

周囲の環境と比べると、塔は異世界のもののように見える。宴席での僕のように、溶け込もうとしない。地面に刺さった短剣のように、生物とは程遠い。巨人用のジャングルジムのように、送電塔はとてつもなく大きいため、遠くからでも見える。妙に狭いパラボラアンテナのように、電波塔は空を向いている。

ちょっと待った。最後の喩えは忘れてほしい。森の上にそびえる携帯の電波塔を通り過ぎる度、ヤヴィン第4衛星の反乱同盟軍の見張り塔を思い浮かべずにはいられない。

とにかく、塔は至る所にあり、紫波の随所をつないでいる。良い意味でも悪い意味でも。

The Less Than Mostly Meet the Wind

Powerful winds blew through Shiwa on Sunday, and many a tall tree bore the brunt of their force, which is essentially these trees’ function. Certainly, they beautify the town, and were they not here the leveled valley floor the town occupies would be far less attractive. (Evidence of this can be found in the new housing developments that have foregone trees altogether). But nothing defines Shiwa’s aesthetics more than “function over form,” and the tallest trees in town were planted as windbreaks called “egune.”

The majority of these trees, which have grown for years under the protection of shrines and old families, are cedars, and thus mostly green even in winter. The rest of the branches, “the less than mostly,” turn brown and give the trees a tint like the roots of dyed hair showing. These parts of the trees give under the force of wind, and come raining down on the houses below, leaving people like us a mess to clean up the next day. I’ve come to think of it as a kind of year end cleaning for the trees, a time when trees that can’t shed leaves rid themselves of unnecessary burden and prepare for the coming year.

The least we can do is pick up after them. After all imagine the wind through the flat valley without the trees.

大部分未満、風に出くわす

日曜日に紫波の町中を力強い風が吹き抜け、背の高い多くの木がそのエネルギーの矢面に立ったが、それが元々の役目である。もちろん、町を美化もするが、もしこの木々が無ければ、町が位置するこの均された盆地はずっと魅力の無いものとなったであろう。(その証拠は、こういった木々無しに開発された新しい住宅街にある。)しかし、紫波の美意識は「見た目より機能」を抜きには語れない。そして、町で最も背の高い木々は「えぐね」と呼ばれる防風林として植えられたものだ。

何年も神社や歴史ある家の庇護の下で生長した、これらの木々の多くは杉で、そのため冬でも大部分は青々している。枝の残りの部分、「大部分未満」は茶色に変色し、染めた髪の根元に地毛の色が見えるようだ。この部分は風の力に屈して下方の家に降り注ぎ、僕たちのような住人に翌日の清掃作業を課す。僕は、これを木々の年末の大掃除と見なし始めた。木々にとっても、自分たちでは取り除くことのできない、負担となる不必要な葉を落とし、新年を迎える時期なのだ。

僕たちにできる最低限のことは、その葉を拾うことだ。えぐねのないこの盆地を風が吹き抜けるところを想像してみてほしい。

Catching Sunlight

I was reminded recently of how beauty can still be found in the landscape even after it’s turned brown with the season. I was driving after three o’clock, and the sun was well on its way to setting and its light coming in at a severe angle. On the other side of rice fields, now nothing but bare soil, I saw something glowing–a row of uncut susuki grass as tall as a person and dried so that the wind moving through it sounded like a long shushing. The seed heads of susuki grass had grown fluffy and long and were now bowing beneath their own weight. They caught the sunlight and held it, and it was they that glowed and caught my eye as shadows fell from the mountains.

日光を捕らえて

季節の変化で茶色になった後でさえ、景色の中に美しさは見つけられると、最近気付かされた。3時過ぎに車を運転していた。太陽は沈む途中にあり、日光は急な角度から差していた。剥き出しになった土しかない田んぼの向こう側に、何か輝いているものが見えた。人の背丈ほどに伸び放題のススキの列が、乾燥しているため風が通り抜けると「シーッ」という音を響かせた。ススキの穂はフワフワとして長くなり、自らの重みで垂れていた。その穂が日光を捕らえて保持していた。輝いていたのはススキの穂で、それが僕の目に留まったのは、山が影を落とした時だった。